Overcome Addictions

Hypnosis, Meditation, Prayer - What’s the difference?
An individual goes to that very special place within to:
  • Talk to God (Prayer)
  • Just to be (Meditation)
  • To change a behavior (Hypnosis)
Habit Control through hypnosis is highly effective. Using hypnosis for weight loss and smoking cessation programs is well recognized for its success. Obstacles encountered when attempting to change habits to cause a weight loss or to stop smoking respond rapidly to hypnosis and melt away.

Those obstacles are often a result of an individual’s lack of motivation. In many instances a person who lacks motivation for self-improvement will also be suffering from low self-esteem. It is difficult to fire up your ambitions in any area if you see yourself as a failure.

Fortunately developing motivation is a key component of hypnosis. Motivation helps develop a successful action plan. Successful action leads to elevated esteem and a general feeling of well -being. With high self-esteem and a positive attitude, one can accomplish anything they choose!

Hypnosis is therefore successful in the following areas:
  • Weight Management Smoking Cessation
  • Tobacco addictions Dental anxiety
  • Surgery Preparation Phobias
  • Assertiveness Sleep Difficulties
  • Pain Management Stress management
  • Memory& Concentration Test anxiety
  • Sports improvement Sales Motivation
  • Substance Abuse Relationship difficulties
What is Addiction?
It may be that uncontrollable urge to consume an entire bag of cookies, the jolt you get from a can of soda or coffee, the high from cigarettes, a shopping spree, the compulsion to work long hours, or a 3-mile run. These addictions are frequently overlooked because they are relatively mild compared to the effects of crack cocaine, heroin and alcohol addiction. Addiction can be defined as various behaviors of a chemically dependent individual (CDI) who is addicted in BOTH a biological (physical, mental, emotional) and psychological (environmental, societal plus other outside influences) way and the intricate interaction of the two. My five-year studies into brain chemistry imbalances have shown me the importance of treating a chemically dependent individual in a physical way as opposed to conventional methods that only focus on the psychological aspect of the disease.

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Rhonda Quin Rhonda Quin
Rhonda Quin, M.A., C.Hy., has been practicing hypnosis for over twenty five years. Rhonda brings a wealth of experience with her. Rhonda is a certified instructor for both Basic and Advanced Clinical Hypnotherapy receiving her certification through the National Guild of Hypnotists.
 
Rhonda Quin
Rhonda Quin, M.A., C.Hy., has been practicing hypnosis for over twenty five years. Rhonda brings a wealth of experience with her. Rhonda is a certified instructor for both Basic and Advanced Clinical Hypnotherapy receiving her certification through the National Guild of Hypnotists.
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Using hypnosis for weight loss and smoking cessation programs is well recognized for its success.
What can I be addicted to? The "brain reward region" is the part of the brain, which is sensitive to addictive behaviors involving the use of illicit drugs (heroine, cocaine), prescription drugs (amphetamines, barbiturates, antidepressants), legal drugs (nicotine, alcohol, caffeine) foods (chocolate, sugar and carbohydrates), but also to compulsive and destructive activities and behaviors (sex, exercise, work, shopping, gambling).

What makes an activity, food, and/or drug an addiction? Craving (excessive physical need ), Salience (thinking about the next high), Euphoria (produce a stimulating feeling), Tolerance (the need for more), Withdrawl (produces stress, depression, anxiety), Conflict (causes health problems), Relapse (quit and start over), Guilt (feeling bad afterwards).

Why are we addicted?
Many scientists are now convinced that what ties all of the mood-altering drugs and behaviors together are the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine, serotonin, GABA and endorphins. These neurotransmitters are responsible for the way we feel, think and act. It has been theorized that chemically dependent individuals are born with a lower number of receptor sites to produce adequate amounts of the (feel good) neurotransmitters. This may explain why a person starts using drugs to begin with, just to get high, but in the end they take them to avoid feeling low. Drugs are the quickest and strongest way to boost our neurotransmitters, however the cycle of drinking, drugging and poor food choices fools the brain, the result being the slowing down of the cell's production of theses neurotransmitters, leaving the brain starved for its natural amino acid (protein) fuel. Research has shown that successful treatment of addiction requires raising these deficiencies with natural amino acids and mood altering activities to give us that "natural high" we are lacking.

Urges Within- Creating Healthy Addictions: Rockin' Recovery